Tuesday, March 11, 2008

What I'm Reading

Actually, one of the books I wanted to share with you all I've just finished reading. It's called, "The Official Handbook of the Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy---The Arguments You Need to Defeat the Loony Left This Election Year" by Mark W. Smith. A good read. A quick read. Even a lefty should get through it quickly with just a minimum of help through parts that confuse them. I have to say in all seriousness that it's amazing just how much in this book should be obvious to all, but isn't. Makes one wonder just what game everyone else is watching.

The other book that I'm a bit over half-way through is Alexandre Dumas' "The Vicomte de Bragelonne", which is the first third of the last book of the Musketeer saga. "The Count of Monte Cristo" was my first Dumas book and after that I just had to check out "The Three Musketeers". I didn't know at the time it spanned three books. Apparently, the third is broken up into three because it was so long. "The Vicomte..." is the title of the third book and in English is the title of the first third of it, followed by "Louise de la Valliere", and finishing with "The Man in the Iron Mask". A quick scan of the table of contents confirms that there is no chapter entitled, "Louise de la Valliere", yet I never see this on the shelves of my local Barnes and Noble. Curious. I'll need to check Amazon or perhaps scan the contents of the many copies of "The Man in the Iron Mask", to see if some enterprising publisher has stuffed it into that book. Oh well. I've got some time.

Both of the books mentioned are well worth the time. I'm really enjoying d'Artagnan & Co. and will be sad when the books come to an end. He is based on a real dude, a book of which should be available somehow and has been mentioned in each intro of each book I've read thus far. I'll be seeking that out as well.

So. What are y'all readin'?

12 comments:

Neil said...

I read "The Official Handbook . . ." a while back and agree with your assessment.

I'm reading Philippians a lot (listening to it or reading it every day for a month). I need to pick something else up as well.

Marshall Art said...

I haven't picked up the Good Book in a bit of a while. That is, not as a source of pleasure reading. There are so many verses being used within debates on the blogs that most of my Scripture reading is reviewing those offerings. In any case, I'm overdue. To occasionally read it as one would any other book, as opposed to meditational, prayerful or even research reading has its own charm.

I am still splitting my reading time between serious reading, such as the Handbook mentioned above, and reading all those classics I never read before, like the Dumas offering. I can even have three or four going, but never more than one classic at a time. I like to savor those.

Les said...

"The Story of B" by Daniel Quinn.

Dan Trabue said...

I like Quinn's first book in that series, but haven't read the others. Thought-provoking.

Marshall, I'd be very interested in hearing what you think of the conclusion of the Musketeers series. I recently read the series and enjoyed them well enough until the final book, but can't disclose why without giving stuff away...

I suspect you won't like the final story, either. Sorry.

I'm reading a non-fiction piece called "Better Off" about a couple that turned Amish for a while (ie, lived without modern "conveniences" on the fringe of an Amish community). Great stuff, wondering how it will conclude.

Doc said...

A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson. This is an historian's view of the history of science. Bryson writes in remarkable clarity and is a magnificent storyteller, always finding the interesting life-angle of science, without detracting from the facts.
In fiction, I just finished Tim Dorsey's latest, Atomic Lobster. Dorsey writes in the style of Hiaasen and Barry, and is crazier than both.
Andrew Morton's Tom Cruise Biography (unauthorized) is probably next on the list.

Doc said...
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Marshall Art said...

Dan,

I am one of those who often reads the introductions to novels. Unfortunately, sometimes surprises are blown out for all to see. I'm aware of what awaits. Nonetheless, I'll be sure to report. I've become quite attached to these characters.

blamin said...

Mark Smith, hmmm, I’ve definitely got to check him out.

I’m currently on a “classic” kick, been reading a little Steinbeck and Dickens. BUT if you like history I have to wholeheartedly endorse William Bennett’s – “America: The last Best Hope”. I’m a history buff, and this is one of the best – no shit!!!

Marshall Art said...

Blamin,

Good selection! I have had Bennett's book in the back of my mind for some time. The title alone puts it on the list as it is a statement of truth in my opinion. I'm a big fan of Dickens. What are you reading of his now?

BB-Idaho said...

'The Stuff of Thought' by Steven Pinker. ..acually more about the peculiarities of language, especially metaphors and tense.

blamin said...

"Hard Times" is what I was about to read by Dickens, before I borrowed Frank McCourt's "Angela's Ashes" from my brother. A most excellant and intense story!

I had just finished "the pearl" by Steinbeck - The man can write - no doubt - but sometimes his work tends to be a little (?!) depressing - but always memorable!

Erudite Redneck said...

Yeah, whatever.